Doubles Mondays launched this week in our Aspire to Excel programme

In preparation for the summer season where doubles really kicks in, whether it's club, county, or in tournament play, we launched Doubles Mondays in the Aspire to Excel Academy programme this week.

Both Jemima King and myself were recently involved in a 2-day course with world doubles guru Louis Cayer (coach to Jamie Murray) on the British Doubles system that has generated a huge amount of success over the last few years and we are bringing this learning back to the programme every Monday night.

The importance of doubles:
  • Doubles makes up 25% of singles ranking on the ITF tour, but also influences singles rankings at junior domestic level
  • Being successful in doubles keeps you in tournament play longer
  • Doubles often decides the tie, whether Fed Cup/Davis Cup, County, Club or University tennis (both US and GB)
  • At pro level the money is increasing - a viable option to singles
  • Its a destination we all share - majority of competitive tennis in adult life is doubles
  • Social aspect - it's fun playing as a team and with friends
  • Skill development - confidence and competence in net-play especially increases as only 1/2 court to cover.  Development of lobs, passing shots, reactions
  • Nice variation from singles

As an overview the British Doubles system is about making players lose because they:

  1. Attempt low % shots due to our positioning
  2. Feel pressured through our movement
  3. Feel uncertain because of our variation

This week we are looking at 'When serving and staying back'.  Currently on the WTA tour 10% of players serve and volley in doubles and 66% of men serve and volley, so you if you serve and stay back, you are playing proper doubles!! Don't be made to feel inferior!

Key points:

  • Serving position that gives you access to both wide and T serves
  • Repositioning after serving based on servers territory to cover and use of the forehand on ball 3
  • Engaging the cross-court battle (breaking doubles sideline)
  • 3/10 times go down-line to create uncertainty